Consumer preferences for organic vegetables in southwestern Nigeria: A choice experiment approach

References

  • Adebola BA, Oladipo OA, Olao FG & Ayodeji OO, 2015. Mobility of the poor in Akure Metropolis: Income and land use approach. Journal of Poverty, Investment and Development 15: 28–33.
  • Adegboye O, Smith C, Anang D & Musa H, 2016. Comparing and contrasting three cultural food customs from Nigeria and analyzing the nutrient content of diets from these cultures with the aim of proffering nutritional intervention. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition 56(15): 2483–94.
  • Adeoye DO, 2016. Challenges of urban housing quality: Insights and experiences of Akure, Nigeria. Procedia – Social and Behavioral Sciences 216: 260–8.
  • Alphonce R & Alfnes F, 2017. Traditional markets in many developing countries are characterised by fresh produce. Journal of Agricultural Economics 68(1): 123–42.
  • Association of Organic Agriculture Practitioners of Nigeria (NOAN), 2018. 2018 Annual General Meeting, Update. Available at https://noanigeria.net/2018-annual-general-meeting-update/?v=bf7410a9ee72
  • Barkley A, 2002. Organic food growth: Producer profits and corporate farming. Manhattan KS: Department of Agricultural Economics, Kansas State University.
  • Bello M & Abdulai A, 2016a. Impact of ex-ante hypothetical bias mitigation methods on attribute non-attendance in choice experiments. American Journal of Agricultural Economics, 98(5), p. 1486–1506.
  • Bello M & Abdulai A, 2016b. Measuring heterogeneity, survey engagement and response quality in preferences for organic products in Nigeria. Applied Economics 48(13): 1159–71.
  • Bellow M & Abdulai A, 2018. The use of a hybrid latent class approach to identify consumer segments and market potential for organic products in Nigeria. Agribusiness 34(2): 190–203.
  • Bonti-Ankomah S & Yiridoe EK, 2006. Organic and conventional food: A literature review of the economics of consumer perceptions and preferences. Truro, Nova Scotia: Organic Agriculture Centre of Canada.
  • Boyle KJ, 2017. Contingent valuation in practice. In Champ PA, Boyle KJ & Brown TC (eds.), A primer on nonmarket valuation. Norwich: Springer.
  • Breidert C, Hahsler M & Reutterer T, 2006. A review of methods for measuring willingness-to-pay. Innovative Marketing 2(4): 8–32.
  • Bruschi V, Shershneva K, Dolgopolova I, Canavari M & Teuber R, 2015. Consumer perception of organic food in emerging markets: Evidence from Saint Petersburg, Russia. Agribusiness 31(3): 414–32.
  • Coulibaly O, Nouhoheflin T, Aitchedji CC, Cherry AJ & Adegbola P, 2011. Consumers’ perceptions and willingness to pay for organically grown vegetables. International Journal of Vegetable Science 17(4): 349–62.
  • Cummings R & Taylor L, 1999. Unbiased value estimates for environmental goods: A cheap talk design for the contingent valuation method. The American Economic Review 89(3): 649–65.
  • Fasina OO, 2016. Comparative analysis of the use of organic and inorganic fertilizers by arable crop farmers in Ondo State, Nigeria. Journal of Organics 3(1): 3–15.
  • Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (FMARD), 2017. The Agriculture Promotion Policy (2016–2020): Building on the successes of the ATA, closing key gaps. Abuja: Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development.
  • Fiebig D, Keane M, Louviere J & Wasi N, 2010. The generalized multinomial logit model: Accounting for scale and coefficient heterogeneity. Marketing Science 29(3): 393–421.
  • Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN), 2014. Organic agriculture in Nigeria. Lagos, Nigeria: USDA Foreign Agricultural Service.
  • Hess S & Train K, 2017. Correlation and scale in mixed logit models. Journal of Choice Modelling 23: 1–8.
  • Hicks RL, 2002. A comparison of stated and revealed preferences methods for fisheries management. Proceedings of the American Agricultural Economics Association 2002 Annual Meeting, 28–31 July, Long Beach CA.
  • International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements (IFOAM), 2017. The world of organic agriculture – Statistics and emerging trends. Frick, Switzerland: IFOAM.
  • Jerrod MP & Wuyang H, 2018. Understanding hypothetical bias: An enhanced meta-analysis. American Journal of Agricultural Economics 100(4): 1186–206.
  • Kassie GT, Abdulai A, Greene WH, Shiferaw B, Abate T, Tarekegne A & Sutcliffe C, 2017. Modeling preference and willingness to pay for drought tolerance (DT) in maize in rural Zimbabwe. World Development 94: 465–77.
  • Katt F & Meixner O, 2020. A systematic review of drivers influencing consumer willingness to pay for organic food. Trends in Food Science and Technology 100: 374–88.
  • Kjær T, 2005. A review of the discrete choice experiment – with emphasis on its application in health care. Health Economics Papers 1, Proceedings of the University of Southern Denmark.
  • Lancaster KJ, 1966. A new approach to consumer theory. Journal of Political Economy 74(2): 132– 57.
  • Lipsey RG & Chrystal KA, 1999. Principles of economics. New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Luttikholt L, 2007. Principles of organic agriculture as formulated by the International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements. NJAS – Wageningen Journal of Life Sciences 54: 347–60.
  • McFadden D, 1986. The choice theory approach to market research. Marketing Science 5(4): 275– 97.
  • McFadden D & Train K, 2000. Mixed MNL models for discrete response. Journal of Applied Econometrics 15(5): 447–70.
  • Morgan-Wall T & Khoury G, 2018. Design of experiments suite: Generate and evaluate optimal designs. https://rdrr.io/cran/skpr/
  • Nandwani D & Nwosisi S, 2016. Global trends in organic agriculture. In Nandwani D (ed.), Organic farming for sustainable agriculture. Sustainable development and biodiversity, vol. 9. Cham: Springer.
  • National Bureau of Statistics (NBS), 2012. Consumption pattern in Nigeria 2009/10. Abuja: National Bureau of Statistics.
  • Nocell G & Kennedy O, 2012. Food health claims – What consumers understand. Food Policy 37(5): 571–80.
  • Obayelu OA, Agboyinu OM & Awotide BA, 2014. Consumers’ perception and willingness to pay for organic leafy vegetables in Urban Oyo State, Nigeria. European Journal of Nutrition and Food Safety 4(2): 127–36.
  • Owoeye RS, Toluwase SO & Sekumade AB, 2017. Willingness to pay for organic vegetable in Ado Ekiti Metropolis, Ekiti State, Nigeria. Asian Research Journal of Agriculture 7(4): 1–8.
  • Owusu V & Anifori MO, 2013. Consumer willingness to pay a premium for organic fruit and vegetable in Ghana. International Food and Agribusiness Management Review 16(1): 67–86.
  • Philip B & Dipeolu AO, 2010. Willingness to pay for organic vegetables in Abeokuta, South West Nigeria. African Journal of Food Agriculture Nutrition and Development 10(11): 4364–78.
  • Probst L, Houedjofonon E, Ayerakwa HM & Haas R, 2012. Will they buy it? The potential for marketing organic vegetables in the food vending sector to strengthen vegetable safety: A choice experiment study in three West African cities. Food Policy 37(3): 296–308.
  • Samuelson PA, 1938. A note on the pure theory of consumer’s behaviour. Economica 5(17): 61–71.
  • Sarrias M & Daziano RA, 2017. Multinomial logit models with continuous and discrete individual heterogeneity in R: The gmnl package. Journal of Statistical Software 79(2). doi:10.18637/jss.v079.i02
  • World Bank, 2016. Poverty reduction in Nigeria in the last decade. Washington: World Bank.
  • Yin S, Chen M, Xu Y & Chen Y, 2017. Chinese consumers’ willingness-to-pay for safety label on tomato: Evidence from choice experiments. China Agricultural Economic Review 9(1): 141–55.
  • Yue C & Tong C, 2009. Organic or local? Investigating consumer preference for fresh produce using a choice experiment with real economic incentives. HortScience 44(2): 366–71.
  • Adebola BA, Oladipo OA, Olao FG & Ayodeji OO, 2015. Mobility of the poor in Akure Metropolis: Income and land use approach. Journal of Poverty, Investment and Development 15: 28–33.
  • Adegboye O, Smith C, Anang D & Musa H, 2016. Comparing and contrasting three cultural food customs from Nigeria and analyzing the nutrient content of diets from these cultures with the aim of proffering nutritional intervention. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition 56(15): 2483–94.
  • Adeoye DO, 2016. Challenges of urban housing quality: Insights and experiences of Akure, Nigeria. Procedia – Social and Behavioral Sciences 216: 260–8.
  • Alphonce R & Alfnes F, 2017. Traditional markets in many developing countries are characterised by fresh produce. Journal of Agricultural Economics 68(1): 123–42.
  • Association of Organic Agriculture Practitioners of Nigeria (NOAN), 2018. 2018 Annual General Meeting, Update.
  • Available at https://noanigeria.net/2018-annual-general-meeting-update/?v=bf7410a9ee72
  • Barkley A, 2002. Organic food growth: Producer profits and corporate farming. Manhattan KS: Department of Agricultural Economics, Kansas State University.
  • Bello M & Abdulai A, 2016a. Impact of ex-ante hypothetical bias mitigation methods on attribute non-attendance in choice experiments. American Journal of Agricultural Economics, 98(5), p. 1486–1506.
  • Bello M & Abdulai A, 2016b. Measuring heterogeneity, survey engagement and response quality in preferences for organic products in Nigeria. Applied Economics 48(13): 1159–71.
  • Bellow M & Abdulai A, 2018. The use of a hybrid latent class approach to identify consumer segments and market potential for organic products in Nigeria. Agribusiness 34(2): 190–203.
  • Bonti-Ankomah S & Yiridoe EK, 2006. Organic and conventional food: A literature review of the economics of consumer perceptions and preferences. Truro, Nova Scotia: Organic Agriculture Centre of Canada.
  • Boyle KJ, 2017. Contingent valuation in practice. In Champ PA, Boyle KJ & Brown TC (eds.), A primer on nonmarket valuation. Norwich: Springer.
  • Breidert C, Hahsler M & Reutterer T, 2006. A review of methods for measuring willingness-to-pay. Innovative Marketing 2(4): 8–32.
  • Bruschi V, Shershneva K, Dolgopolova I, Canavari M & Teuber R, 2015. Consumer perception of organic food in emerging markets: Evidence from Saint Petersburg, Russia. Agribusiness 31(3): 414–32.
  • Coulibaly O, Nouhoheflin T, Aitchedji CC, Cherry AJ & Adegbola P, 2011. Consumers’ perceptions and willingness to pay for organically grown vegetables. International Journal of Vegetable Science 17(4): 349–62.
  • Cummings R & Taylor L, 1999. Unbiased value estimates for environmental goods: A cheap talk design for the contingent valuation method. The American Economic Review 89(3): 649–65.
  • Fasina OO, 2016. Comparative analysis of the use of organic and inorganic fertilizers by arable crop farmers in Ondo State, Nigeria. Journal of Organics 3(1): 3–15.
  • Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (FMARD), 2017. The Agriculture Promotion Policy (2016–2020): Building on the successes of the ATA, closing key gaps. Abuja: Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development.
  • Fiebig D, Keane M, Louviere J & Wasi N, 2010. The generalized multinomial logit model: Accounting for scale and coefficient heterogeneity. Marketing Science 29(3): 393–421.
  • Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN), 2014. Organic agriculture in Nigeria. Lagos, Nigeria: USDA Foreign Agricultural Service.
  • Hess S & Train K, 2017. Correlation and scale in mixed logit models. Journal of Choice Modelling 23: 1–8.
  • Hicks RL, 2002. A comparison of stated and revealed preferences methods for fisheries management. Proceedings of the American Agricultural Economics Association 2002 Annual Meeting, 28–31 July, Long Beach CA.
  • International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements (IFOAM), 2017. The world of organic agriculture – Statistics and emerging trends. Frick, Switzerland: IFOAM.
  • Jerrod MP & Wuyang H, 2018. Understanding hypothetical bias: An enhanced meta-analysis. American Journal of Agricultural Economics 100(4): 1186–206.
  • Kassie GT, Abdulai A, Greene WH, Shiferaw B, Abate T, Tarekegne A & Sutcliffe C, 2017. Modeling preference and willingness to pay for drought tolerance (DT) in maize in rural Zimbabwe. World Development 94: 465–77.
  • Katt F & Meixner O, 2020. A systematic review of drivers influencing consumer willingness to pay for organic food. Trends in Food Science and Technology 100: 374–88.
  • Kjær T, 2005. A review of the discrete choice experiment – with emphasis on its application in health care. Health Economics Papers 1, Proceedings of the University of Southern Denmark.
  • Lancaster KJ, 1966. A new approach to consumer theory. Journal of Political Economy 74(2): 132–57.
  • Lipsey RG & Chrystal KA, 1999. Principles of economics. New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Luttikholt L, 2007. Principles of organic agriculture as formulated by the International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements. NJAS – Wageningen Journal of Life Sciences 54: 347¬–60.
  • McFadden D, 1986. The choice theory approach to market research. Marketing Science 5(4): 275–97.
  • McFadden D & Train K, 2000. Mixed MNL models for discrete response. Journal of Applied Econometrics 15(5): 447–70.
  • Morgan-Wall T & Khoury G, 2018. Design of experiments suite: Generate and evaluate optimal designs. https://rdrr.io/cran/skpr/
  • Nandwani D & Nwosisi S, 2016. Global trends in organic agriculture. In Nandwani D (ed.), Organic farming for sustainable agriculture. Sustainable development and biodiversity, vol. 9. Cham: Springer.
  • National Bureau of Statistics (NBS), 2012. Consumption pattern in Nigeria 2009/10. Abuja: National Bureau of Statistics.
  • Nocell G & Kennedy O, 2012. Food health claims – What consumers understand. Food Policy 37(5): 571–80.
  • Obayelu OA, Agboyinu OM & Awotide BA, 2014. Consumers’ perception and willingness to pay for organic leafy vegetables in Urban Oyo State, Nigeria. European Journal of Nutrition and Food Safety 4(2): 127–36.
  • Owoeye RS, Toluwase SO & Sekumade AB, 2017. Willingness to pay for organic vegetable in Ado Ekiti Metropolis, Ekiti State, Nigeria. Asian Research Journal of Agriculture 7(4): 1–8.
  • Owusu V & Anifori MO, 2013. Consumer willingness to pay a premium for organic fruit and vegetable in Ghana. International Food and Agribusiness Management Review 16(1): 67–86.
  • Philip B & Dipeolu AO, 2010. Willingness to pay for organic vegetables in Abeokuta, South West Nigeria. African Journal of Food Agriculture Nutrition and Development 10(11): 4364–78.
  • Probst L, Houedjofonon E, Ayerakwa HM & Haas R, 2012. Will they buy it? The potential for marketing organic vegetables in the food vending sector to strengthen vegetable safety: A choice experiment study in three West African cities. Food Policy 37(3): 296–308.
  • Samuelson PA, 1938. A note on the pure theory of consumer’s behaviour. Economica 5(17): 61–71.
  • Sarrias M & Daziano RA, 2017. Multinomial logit models with continuous and discrete individual heterogeneity in R: The gmnl package. Journal of Statistical Software 79(2). doi:10.18637/jss.v079.i02
  • World Bank, 2016. Poverty reduction in Nigeria in the last decade. Washington: World Bank.
  • Yin S, Chen M, Xu Y & Chen Y, 2017. Chinese consumers’ willingness-to-pay for safety label on tomato: Evidence from choice experiments. China Agricultural Economic Review 9(1): 141–55.
  • Yue C & Tong C, 2009. Organic or local? Investigating consumer preference for fresh produce using a choice experiment with real economic incentives. HortScience 44(2): 366–71.